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ManageMental Podcast with Blasko and Mike Mowery

Two experienced artist managers and music industry professionals bring you their take on the modern day music business and how they mentally approach the profession of management. Join Blasko and Mike Mowery as they cover hot topics in the industry, answer fan questions, provide insight on sales numbers and showcase new music with a slant toward developing artists.
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Now displaying: June, 2017
Jun 28, 2017

Blasko and Mike get into more listener questions based on the costs associated with being in a touring band. This week the question comes from new listener David Woolfall who writes:

“I just discovered your podcast via an ad on the Lead Singer Syndrome podcast. I’ve listened through maybe half of the podcasts so far and they’re great! I am not in the music industry at all just an interested spectator. I have questions related to money…

  • I would love for you to give an example of a small band income vs. expenses ie. A band that can sell 500tickets 1x or 2x a year in a place like Denver. How much does this band earn from the venue, merch, VIP, etc?
  • Lets assume they get minimal radio play so that their music sale income is Spotify + iTunes.
  • What does it cost them to tour, hire a few techs, gas, food, some hotels or an RV?
  • Basically, do most band members have regular jobs at home to make ends meet?

 

Find out answers to these questions and more in this episode.

 

Email any questions or comments to askblasko@gmail.com

Find Blasko on Twitter and Instagram: @blasko1313

Find Mike Mowery on Twitter and Instagram: @mikeoloop

Want to get your band to the top of the charts with your next album release? Sign up for Mike Mowery’s “Release It Right” and “Unleash It Right” webinars at signup.outerloopcoaching.com

ManageMental is part of the Jabberjaw Media Network. www.jabberjawmedia.com 

Jun 26, 2017

 

“Record Deal Red Flags” by Byron Pascoe:

 http://www.musicthinktank.com/blog/10-record-deal-red-flags.html

Mr. Pascoe is a Canadian Entertainment Lawyer with Edwards PC, Creative Law and can be reached at Byron.pascoe@edwardslaw.ca

 

This week Blasko and Mike tackle the warning signs that you may see in a record deal. That first record deal can seem very rewarding on the surface, but in reality it might just be a total nightmare. Entertainment attorney Byron Pascoe’s article “Record Deal Red Flags” is the basis for this week’s episode. Follow along as Blasko and Mike break down the following points from the article:

  1. Inconsistencies between what you are told and what’s in the contract

It may be on purpose, or not, but just because the A&R gal at the label told you one thing, doesn’t mean the record deal you’re asked to sign is completely consistent. An obvious example is if you’re told you’re getting an advance of $5K, but the agreement doesn’t provide for an advance. 

  1. Being asked to give more rights than are needed

A record label doesn’t need publishing rights to distribute your music. As such, if you are being asked to provide publishing rights to the label, then you’re being asked to provide more rights than are needed to accomplish the label’s main function – distributing your music digitally and physically.

Unless you’re being appropriately compensated for the publishing rights, and the label is the right fit to be both your distributor and your publisher, then the requirement to grant publishing rights to your label is likely excessive.

 

  1. Future sales advances

Labels generally ask for the option to extend their rights. The label may promise you an upfront cash advance (against future sales) if they decide to extend their rights – which is referred to as exercising their option(s), but are you automatically entitled to get an advance? The label may have written the agreement in such a way that based on prior sales, they can access those additional rights by paying you a lower advance than the number in the agreement, or no advance at all.

 

  1. Uncapped expenses

The formula used to determine how much money you make from music sales from the label might be gross revenue less the label’s expenses multiplied by a percentage. However, without any limitation on the label’s expenses, you may never get paid anything.

 

  1. Not getting it in writing

What do you want the label to do? Spend some money on marketing and promotion? If they aren’t willing to put their verbal commitment in writing, maybe the label isn’t going to do what they verbally promised.

 

  1. No provision to get details

The label is responsible to pay you. As such, they should also have an obligation to give you details about how they calculated your payment. Also, you should have the ability to make sure the numbers are accurate by having the right to take a look at the label’s records (referred to as an audit).

 

  1. Lack of clear termination provisions

If there isn’t a clear way for you to get out of the contract, you will wish you had a way out, including if the label isn’t paying you what you are entitled to receive, but are still selling your music.

Also, if you’re told a label agreement is take it or leave it, and the label won’t answer your questions about the agreement, they may not be the most trusted partner.

On a brighter note, if you read a record label agreement before signing, get some assistance from fellow musicians and/or a music lawyer, and the label is willing to discuss and reasonably negotiate the agreement, it may be the start of a beautiful relationship…

 

Email any questions or comments to askblasko@gmail.com

Find Blasko on Twitter and Instagram: @blasko1313

Find Mike Mowery on Twitter and Instagram: @mikeoloop

Want to get your band to the top of the charts with your next album release? Sign up for Mike Mowery’s “Release It Right” and “Unleash It Right” webinars at signup.outerloopcoaching.com

ManageMental is part of the Jabberjaw Media Network. www.jabberjawmedia.com 

 

Jun 19, 2017

 Reference Article: https://bandzoogle.com/blog/social-media-marketing-for-musicians-how-to-get-more-fans-on-instagram

Mike and Blasko tackle basic marketing strategies on Instagram for musicians. Follow along as they go through each point with real world examples and in-depth details so you can make your own account stand out from the crowd.

 

  1. Pick a Username

 

Pick something easy and predictable. All of your social media handles should make sense together. Don’t add numbers, symbols, or underscores if you don’t need to.

  1. Get a Decent Profile Photo

Instagram profile photos are relatively small and users can’t click on them to blow them up. Use a profile picture that is easy to see on a standard-size phone. Use a band logo or photo that is clear and easy to make out.

 

  1. Leave a Bio that Makes an Impression

 

Your bio can only be 150 characters - almost the same length as a tweet. Write something that leaves an impression. You don’t have to take up the whole space either.

 

  1. Website Link

 

With a social platform like Instagram, it can often be hard to explain what you do through a photo. People will see snapshots of your life, but they won’t necessarily get a well-rounded idea of what you do for a living or who you/your band are. This is why a link is so important. Give people a way to find out more about you. It will most definitely enhance their appreciation of your photo posts.

 

Email any questions or comments to askblasko@gmail.com

Find Blasko on Twitter and Instagram: @blasko1313

Find Mike Mowery on Twitter and Instagram: @mikeoloop

Want to get your band to the top of the charts with your next album release? Sign up for Mike Mowery’s “Release It Right” and “Unleash It Right” webinars at signup.outerloopcoaching.com

ManageMental is part of the Jabberjaw Media Network. www.jabberjawmedia.com 

Jun 12, 2017

Bonus Episode: This week Mike is filling in for Blasko as the host with the most and is joined by his Outerloop Coaching partner, Paul. In this episode Mike and Paul cover some highlights from the first Outerloop Coaching webinar Sixty Days to Signable, and talk about the new classes they are launching this week: Release It Right and Unleash It Right.

 

The Release It Right webinar will take place on July 22nd at 2pm EDT and cover the best strategies to help participants successfully release music independently, reach the biggest possible first-week sales, and maximize fan engagement.

 

Unleash It Right webinar will include the Release It Right session in addition to a second class on July 29th at 2pm EDT for advanced students to understand how to get the most out of streaming services, get physical albums into brick and mortar retail stores, and learn how to get streams and sales to count towards getting a release onto the Billboard charts.

 

Head to OuterloopCoaching.com to sign up and learn more about the classes.

 

Email any questions or comments to askblasko@gmail.com

Find Blasko on Twitter and Instagram: @blasko1313

Find Mike Mowery on Twitter and Instagram: @mikeoloop

ManageMental is part of the Jabberjaw Media Network. www.jabberjawmedia.com 

Jun 5, 2017

Oh Lorde, pray leaving your manager wasn't a mistake

http://www.theguardian.com/music/musicblog/2015/may/19/oh-lorde-pray-leaving-your-manager-wasnt-a-mistake

 

5 Types of Artists Good Managers Will Never Work With

http://encore.celebrityaccess.com/index.php?encoreId=508&articleId=50915

 

This Is What Managers Think It Takes To Be Successful In Music In 2015

http://www.thefader.com/2015/01/08/9-managers-explain-how-to-win-music-in-2015

 

What Does A Manager Actually Do? - @patthemanager

https://www.instagram.com/p/BHpxnqOBBu0/

 

This week  Mike and Blasko answer listener Shaun Paramore’s questions about choosing the right manager. She writes:

 

Please discuss the importance and many things to take into consideration before choosing professional management. Choosing the wrong management can take the wind out of your sails over a period of time and in many cases have led to the disbanding of a group that excelled musically but did not know the industry and trusted their team and was mishandled in every way. Such was the case personally with my old band

 

-Should you go with management who has a similar sounding artist who have found a certain degree of success or the other direction with management that doesn't have an act like you yet? Will you fall into a formula of what's worked for those before you or create your own path

 

-How do you go about determining how much success a courting management has been apart of or responsible for when looking into their existing lineup?

 

-How much control and influence do you let your management and label have? Many managers and label personnel are not artists themselves so there can be conflict in terms of direction. How much conflict should be allowed?

 

-Once comfortable with your choice for management. What kind of contract should be discussed? Should a band be held to contract if they feel their management is not fulfilling their duties with the upmost attention and competence?

 

-Lastly. Your personal thoughts and opinions. Would either one of you work with an up and coming artist you believed to have a sound, drive and plan if they firmly decided to stay independent from label representation at that time in their developing career?

 

Email any questions or comments to askblasko@gmail.com

Find Blasko on Twitter and Instagram: @blasko1313

Find Mike Mowery on Twitter and Instagram: @mikeoloop

ManageMental is part of the Jabberjaw Media Network. www.jabberjawmedia.com 

 

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